2014 Fieldwork Notes: Day 1

Editor’s note: Per the rules of qualitative geography, general “best practices” in fieldwork, and my advisor, I am debriefing every day of this week of fieldwork—a practice that basically entails taking extensive notes about what happened during the day, what I saw, thought, felt, etc. Writing these ideas down when they are fresh is KEY to being able to remember, processes, and write about these fieldwork experiences in the future. Since I rarely blog, and my readership is all of about five people, I thought I would share my notes with the world. They are not heavily edited—part of the “safety” of this kind of note taking is that there is no judgment for stream of conscience writing. Perhaps you will enjoy following along.

So far, so good. The trip has had a successful start after picking up the UT car (nice Dodge Avenger) and hitting the road. Took a conference call with some UCW folks at the Smith County rest area for about an hour.

In Nashville, I visited the Tennessee State Museum. Although my visit was brief, I saw two short-term (“Changing Gallery”) exhibits while there—the Slaves and Slaveholders of Wessyngton Plantation and an exhibit of African American art from Tennessee artists. The Wessyngton Plantation exhibit could be useful as an example of a museum exhibit (while temporary) that encompasses a deep history of a single plantation. It succeeds in telling a pretty complete and authentic narrative about slavery practices in Tennessee. Some of the particular things that stood out to me were the inclusion of displaying shackles (two different kinds, have to review the photos), under glass though–can’t be held/touched, in the exhibit and the decision to focus much of the narrative on a few key personalities and their descendants. I also liked the exhibit’s efforts to include a few information placards at key spaces that explained how the information came to be known/researched/included in the exhibit. (Question to go back to in the photos—were these shown with any kind of controversial parts of the exhibit?!) So, for example, one sign discussed how a lot of information presented in the exhibit was made possible because the white planter-class family kept extensively detailed records about everything. Another “method” if you will that was mentioned was oral histories that were passed down through some of the slaves’ descendants and their families. All very useful to think about.

One other item to note — I didn’t spend a ton of time looking through the museum’s permanent galleries, but I meandered briefly through the state’s Civil War history section. Spatially, it was quite interesting to observe how much prominent space was given to armaments (cannons, rifles, pistols, swords, etc.) in the exhibit and to explaining some of the key battles and state politicians/personalities VS. the extremely small section devoted to discussing Nathan Bedford Forrest and the start of the KKK, which occupied a small glass case tucked away facing a wall about three feet away, on the “bookend” of “end cap” of two other displays.

After driving to Birmingham, I first stopped in downtown to (re)photograph some of the city’s Civil Rights district. I have photos of the park area from the last time I was in Birmingham, for the Southeastern Journalism Conference during my undergrad. I think the city (or another group/institution) has added some informational markers around Kelly Ingram Park, adjacent to the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (which was closed by the time I got there) and 16th Street Baptist Church where Martin Luther King, Jr. was once pastor. These photos can come in handy later for discussing (and teaching about) Alabama’s desire to latch onto Civil Rights history/memory vs. addressing the slavery and the Emancipation eras.

Plans for tomorrow:

  • Stop in Tuscaloosa on the way to Natchez to photograph three signs for the Alabama Marker paper – Alabama Riverwalk and a couple of historically Black churches
  • Drive to Meridian, MS, for lunch with an old friend (Gavin Breeden) and if possible, take a look at/photograph Meridian’s new Civil Rights Trail
  • Drive to Natchez and evaluate what I have time to accomplish.

One thought on “2014 Fieldwork Notes: Day 1”

  1. Sounds like a very full day! I’m impressed you got so much from the Tennessee Museum so quickly, but maybe that’s due to spending so much time doing history/museum tours when we took vacations! You’ll have to return to Nashville to go through the museum again.

    I’m happy to see that you’re blogging again, even if it’s ‘just fieldwork notes’!

    Like

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