2014 Fieldwork Notes: Day 3

Sorry these notes didn’t get posted yesterday. I actually had time to sit and think (and write in a notebook) during my lunch and dinner yesterday. Today (Friday) I’m eating breakfast at the Natchez Coffee Company, which I popped into yesterday afternoon for some cold coffee (IT’S HOT AROUND HERE!) and they have free wifi, so I’m working on typing up my notes from yesterday.

Frogmore Plantation – Lynette Turner, owner & main tour guide

(Written while eating lunch at Pearl Street Pasta, just around the corner from the Natchez African American Museum—also sometimes referred to as the Af. Am. History and Culture Museum).

This moring I went to Frogmore Plantation, just across the river in Concordia Parrish. When I showed up, I was the first car—and sitting right out front was a BIG tour bus with a Wisconsin Badger on the side. Turns out, a large group of (white) retirees from Wisconsin was doing a group tour (ironically? with their black bus driver), so I just joined them part-way in to their tour. The tour itself lived up to the expectations generated by their website, which mentions slavery front and center. The two tour guides I interacted with were all well-informed about the history of slavery in the area and what life was like on the plantation. Particularly noteworthy was the co-owner (Lynette, owns the farm with her husband Buddy—may want to interview her in the future, but I would need an IRB for this). Lynette has apparently conducted quite a bit of archival research (and read numerous books/anthologies on slavery, many of which are worked into the tour narrative) and has written a book on plantation life and slavery. (Didn’t catch the name of this book, but I can email for more information.) The tour includes (first and foremost NOT the “big house” because it is still being used for the Turners to live in) several historical structures including the overseer’s house, the slave kitchen and quarters, a church built on the property, the smokehouse, etc., before moving on to the 1880s-era cotton gin. The Wisconsonites also toured the modern ginning operations, so I finished up with the part of the tour I missed at the beginning. While one of the tour guides (the one other than Lynette—didn’t catch her name) described the overall nature of the tour as not being a “slaves and (in?) shackles” tour, it was obvious that the operation paid a lot of attention and time to telling the slaves’ story. (Some thoughts on this: maybe easier for the Turners to tell these stories because they are not descendants of the original white plantation-owning family. Buddy leased the farm and later purchased it from descendants.) In the video that was supposed to start the tour, Lynette explains that not all of the structures were original to the property, but when the decided to restore and open the structures for touring, they searched in Louisiana and Mississippi for additional structures to purchase and move to their property. She discussed the difficulties of work in the fields…and referenced several books I need to investigate.

Other things: they have used 12 Years a Slave (the book) for 16 years as a part of their tours. Somewhat sad to see how slavery has been so Hollywood-ized through films like this, but accept the fact that at least the films put slavery more into the public consciousness. Something to think about for the slavery in the media paper this fall.

Natchez African American Museum – David Dreyer, Local historian and volunteer museum curator/docent

  • One of the earliest exhibits in the museum (it’s grown quite piecemeal over the years) is a look at middle class black life, not necessarily sharecropping. Pieces donated by Natchez African American community, reflects the fact that many were not sharecroppers, even if their grandparents had been.
  • Need to check out Richard Wright’s books! (Local to Natchez, quite famous author)
  • “We will shoot back” ­– investigate the Deacons of Defense (as counter-narrative to the common stories of the Civil Rights Movement)
  • Slavery of Native Americans – first slaves in the Natchez area under the French (lot of French tourists to Natchez). Africans were later brought as slaves, first from Mali (Bamara Tribe, I believe.)
  • Discussion of “what should be shown? What should be included in the museum?” curators struggle over this.
  • US Colored Troops ­– counter-narrative to Civil War narratives
  • Mississippi in Africa – book by Alan Hoffman
  • Prince among Slaves (and documentary film about it) ­– includes David Dreyer as a commentator
  • Liberia’s Declaration of Independence ­– read this for reference

So, it’s a good thing I’m writing a paper on popular media accounts of slavery later on this year —David and the Frogmore people discussed Hollywood films and the impressions of slavery that viewers get from them. Particularly relevant (in these parts) is 12 Years a Slave because Solomon Northup was enslaved in a nearby part of Louisiana, and a cabin from the Epps plantation is on the campus of LSU Alexandria.

2 thoughts on “2014 Fieldwork Notes: Day 3”

  1. Wow! That’s a lot of history you took in yesterday! and a lot to digest later, too…..

    I imagine you’re glad you don’t live down near the coast – it’s pretty hot & humid there this time of year. You’d have to invest in one of those white & blue-striped seerseeker suits 🙂

    Like

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